Where can I learn French in California

What languages ​​do Americans learn today?

Americans only speak English and that's it - or is it? We look at what languages ​​Americans really learn.

Americans only care about the US. The rest of the world and other languages ​​do not exist for them. At least that is the prejudice. But what is it about the prejudices? And what languages ​​do Americans learn when they are?

English - the language of the USA?

Before we look at the learning languages ​​in the USA, there is one prejudice to be cleared up: that the Americans only speak English. The American Community Survey According to a 2016 study by the Census Bureau, only about 238 million people speak English only at home. That sounds like a lot at first. But there are around 326 million people in the United States. So 89 million people in the USA speak a second language at home - that's more than the total population of Germany.

English is also not an official language in the US, at least not at the federal level. 30 out of 50 American states have made English the only official language.

What languages ​​do Americans learn in elementary and high school?

In elementary and secondary levels, around 18.5 percent of students learn another language. Compared to European school systems, that's not exactly a lot. To be fair, it must be said that most European students at least English learn what happens in American schools anyway. Most American school systems offer language instruction in the High school and language courses have to be taken for one to three years to graduate from school. Some schools already integrate language courses into the curriculum in middle school or elementary school. In general, it can be said that it is becoming more and more popular to learn new languages. And which languages ​​are learned? This is revealed by data from the years 2007 to 2008.

  1. First place is very clear Spanish with 72.06%.
  2. Behind it lies French with 14.08%.
  3. Follows in third place German with 4.43%.
  4. Latin 2.30% of the students learn - not bad for a dead language!
  5. Japanese is learned by 0.82% of students.
  6. Italian is in sixth place with 0.73%.
  7. Chinese is the most widely spoken language in the world and is the seventh most studied language in American schools at 0.67%.
  8. Language number eight is not a spoken one at all: American Sign Language learn 0.46% of students.
  9. Russian learn 0.14% of American students.
  10. Lie behind other languageswhich total 2.87%.

And what languages ​​do Americans learn at university?

In the summer semester of 2016, a study by the Modern Language Association according to the following languages ​​taken at American colleges and universities.

  1. In first place is again Spanish with 61.6%.
  2. American Sign Language even made it to 9.5% in tertiary education.
  3. French follows in third place with 8.7%.
  4. German After all, 3.6% of American students who take language courses still vote.
  5. Japanese follows with 3.2%.
  6. Share sixth place Chinese and Italian with 2.5% each.
  7. Arabic and their dialects learn 2.1% of American students.
  8. Eighth place among the languages ​​learned by American students Russian with 1.3%.
  9. Another dead language has made it ahead of Latin in popularity at universities in the United States: Ancient Greek with 0.8%.
  10. Latin finally follows in tenth place with 0.7%.

Other languages ​​that didn't make it into the top 10 are Korean, Hebrew (both biblical and modern), Portuguese and with 1.8 percentother languages.

In general, however, it can be observed that fewer language courses have been taken in American colleges and universities since 2013 - a shame, actually. But maybe it has something to do with the fact that there are now great self-learning methods?

Katrin Sperling
Katrin Sperling was born and raised in Potsdam and spent a year in Toronto, Canada after graduating from high school. Because her Hogwarts letter had still not arrived on her 20th birthday in 2011, she finally had to accept reality and studied English and German linguistics in Berlin. Fortunately, linguistics turned out to be just as magical, which is why Katrin is very happy to be writing about languages ​​for Babbel Magazine.
Katrin Sperling was born and raised in Potsdam and spent a year in Toronto, Canada after graduating from high school. Because her Hogwarts letter had still not arrived on her 20th birthday in 2011, she finally had to accept reality and studied English and German linguistics in Berlin. Fortunately, linguistics turned out to be just as magical, which is why Katrin is very happy to be writing about languages ​​for Babbel Magazine.

You might be interested in that too