Is 600 kbps fast enough

You need this cell phone speed for fast internet

The first thing that catches your eye with a mobile phone tariff is the volume of data it contains. The simple equation “a lot of data volume is equally good” does not easily solve, however, because there is another important factor for mobile Internet: the transmission speed. We explain to you how you can find out at what cell phone speed your smartphone is on the move and how fast the data transfer has to be in order to surf quickly.

Handy speed - the way to the fast network

EDGE, UMTS or LTE: These letters in your status bar tell you whether your smartphone is surfing the net quickly or not. The tariff for your mobile phone therefore not only includes an Allnet Flat rate and a lot of data volume in GB, but also the possible maximum speed with which the smartphone uses mobile data. Different speeds are offered depending on the provider such as O2, Deutsche Telekom or Vodafone. It is usually a little smaller under the data volume in the tariff overview.

Network standards - a jumble of letters in the status bar

It is really not easy for laypeople to keep track of this jumble of letters and numbers. Let's start with network reception. That depends on your location. You can see which connection is currently available to you in your status bar.

But what do the letters mean in detail? These Overview shows you all common network standards including their meaning and maximum speed:

  • G - GPRS - General Packet Radio Service - max. 53.6 kbit / s
  • E. - EDGE - Enhanced Data Rates for GSM Evolution - max. 256 kbit / s
  • 3G - UMTS - Universal Mobile Telecommunications System - max. 384 Kbit / s
  • H (3G with iOS) - High Speed ​​Downlink Packet Access (HSDPA) - max.7.2 Mbit / s
  • H + (3G with iOS) - High Speed ​​Packet Access (HSPA +) - max. 42 Mbit / s
  • LTE (partly 4G with iOS) - Long Term Evolution - max. 500 Mbit / s
  • LTE-A (also 4G or 4G + with iOS) - LTE-Advanced - max. 1 Gbit / s
  • 5G - fifth generation of the cellular standard - max. 10 Gbit / s - only from 2019/2020

In the country or in tunnels, we receive very little, as network coverage is usually not guaranteed. Then there is usually an E in the status bar. GPRS hardly exists today, unless you are using a very old tariff with an old cell phone. GPRS and EDGE were the first network standards in the early 2000s. Today we mostly use HSPA + or the 4th generation of network expansion - LTE. The next level, 5G, is expected to catapult up to 10 Gbit / s of data by 2020. Network coverage is expected to be significantly better than before due to certain frequencies. Samsung announced last fall that a 5G-capable smartphone would hit the market in spring 2019.

Maximum speed and what it means

Similar to DSL, providers and providers offer different maximum speeds in their tariffs. O2 offers up to 225 Mbit / s, Deutsche Telekom up to 300 Mbit / s, and Vodafone even up to 500 Mbit / s. That all sounds really nice, but what do the numbers and units of measurement actually mean?

The unit bit / s indicates how many bits are transmitted per second. Bits are also specified in kilobits, megabits and gigabits - Kbit, Mbit and Gbit.

You really surf that fast

It is now the case, however, that the specified values ​​are almost never achieved. It is just the maximum transmission rate provided by the provider. So you shouldn't just let yourself be carried away by a three-digit number in the mobile phone tariff.
If you think that your smartphone is surfing far below the data given by the provider, you can easily check this with a speed test. Note that you are not in the WLAN during the test. The location, frequency of use of the cell phone and the features of the smartphone also play a role and can influence the result. With the speed test of the DEINHANDY app you can see exactly how fast your internet is.

How much Mbit / s do you really need?

First of all: super high speed is not absolutely necessary. You will hardly download or send larger data sets with your data volume. Most of the time, large files are quickly loaded onto the smartphone at apparently low maximum speeds.
For comparison, we have calculated the download times for typical speed classes. The last variant is the current maximum speed that O2 offers in tariffs.

21 Mbit / s

Cell phone photo (3 MB)

Mp3 (13 MB)

Short video in full HD (70 MB)

Download

1 second

4 seconds

26 seconds

42 Mbit / s

Cell phone photo (3 MB)

Mp3 (13 MB)

Short video in full HD (70 MB)

Download

0.75 second

2 seconds

13 seconds

225 Mbit / s

Cell phone photo (3 MB)

Mp3 (13 MB)

Short video in full HD (70 MB)

Download

0.11 second

0.46 seconds

2 seconds

As you can see, even with "only" 21 Mbit / s you only have to wait a few seconds for a file. Tariffs with a maximum speed of 21.6 Mbit / s are absolutely sufficient to surf quickly. If the tariff also includes LTE, nothing can go wrong, because LTE frequency bands are better developed than 3G, especially in rural areas.

In the future, speeds will of course continue to increase and files will also get larger and larger due to factors such as improved image quality. So if you do a lot with your smartphone, you are well advised to opt for a tariff that offers more than 42 Mbit / s.