A robot apocalypse is inevitable

How do I deal with unintended events of politically hot topics?

Celtschk

One idea might be to think about your motivation and judgment. How does he know how to comfort her? Or that in this situation it is right to console her?

He must have a source of information about what would be right. Ordinarily I would assume that this came from the social environment in which he grew up (e.g. that his mother comforted him when he had nightmares as a child), but you wrote that he grew up completely isolated.

The only way he could have gotten this information is that him self previously (or possibly still from time to time) experienced what the girl has now experienced, and he knew what he was would have liked .

That is, portray it specifically as a weak, but exactly this weakness enables him to understand her and thus to help her in her weakness, and in turn to help her to make herself stronger.

Another option is to consider whether the person with the nightmare must be a girl. Of course, I don't know your story so I can't tell it, but maybe your story can work just as well when comforting a boy who was having nightmares? Or, if the girls play an important role later, you might divide them into two experiences, the first with a boy and then a repetition of the same situation with the girl (the protagonist's experience that he is again can do , could also be very helpful for its development).

Thomas Myron

The character must be a girl and there can only be one character. I think your first idea is great. The protagonist never knew his parents, but as a young man he had a lot of nightmares. Comforting the girl is the first natural reaction he makes.