Scientific Research What is NEMS

    The Integrated Silicon Systems division is part of the Fraunhofer Institute for Photonic Microsystems IPMS in Dresden, which has been researching silicon-based micromechanical and microphotonic systems for over 25 years. Hardly any high-growth technical sector can do without microsystem components such as sensors or actuators. Current trends such as the Internet of Things or Industry 4.0 open up numerous new fields of application for micromechanical components, with simultaneously increasing requirements in terms of performance, miniaturization, energy consumption, integrability and reliability.

    The scientists at Fraunhofer IPMS work on the optimization of existing micromechanical components and their adaptation for new applications as well as on the development and testing of completely new technologies, micro (opto) electro-mechanical systems (MEMS and MOEMS) as well as nano-electro- Mechanical systems (NEMS). The range of services covers the entire development chain for CMOS-compatible MEMS products and technologies, from conception to process development, the construction of demonstrators and prototypes to pilot production in a state-of-the-art clean room according to industrial standards.

    At the IPMS-ISS branch in Cottbus, research is focused on two subject areas in cooperation with the Brandenburg University of Technology Cottbus-Senftenberg. In the “Monolithic Integrated Actuator and Sensor Systems” business area, a new class of electrostatic bending actuators (NED) is being developed and tested for a wide variety of fields of application. The innovative approach of the new actuator class enables the implementation of components, systems and applications such as micro and nanomanipulators, micro pumps and valves, micro loudspeakers and optical switches. The potential range of applications extends from optics, measurement and medical technology and biotechnology to communication technology.

    The institute also deals with the development of innovative, miniaturized terahertz micromodules and the evaluation of their applications. Due to its wavelength (1 THz corresponds to 300 µm) and its comparatively low photon energy in the milli-electron volt range, terahertz radiation is ideal for use in non-destructive material testing, telecommunications or diagnostics and imaging in medicine and biotechnology. Numerous applications, especially for mobile use, require a degree of miniaturization of the systems. The focus of the scientists at Fraunhofer IPMS-ISS is therefore the integration of the THz source, modulator and detector in a single system that can be miniaturized, CMOS-compatible and scalable. The research work is based on the expertise available at Fraunhofer IPMS in the field of system development, system integration and application testing of application-specific, electrostatically driven MEMS-based microscanner mirrors and micromirror arrays.

    The Integrated Silicon Systems division is part of the Fraunhofer Institute for Photonic Microsystems IPMS in Dresden, which has been researching silicon-based micromechanical and microphotonic systems for over 25 years. Hardly any high-growth technical sector can do without microsystem components such as sensors or actuators. Current trends such as the Internet of Things or Industry 4.0 open up numerous new fields of application for micromechanical components, with simultaneously increasing requirements in terms of performance, miniaturization, energy consumption, integrability and reliability.

    The scientists at Fraunhofer IPMS work on the optimization of existing micromechanical components and their adaptation for new applications as well as on the development and testing of completely new technologies, micro (opto) electro-mechanical systems (MEMS and MOEMS) and nano-electro- Mechanical systems (NEMS). The range of services covers the entire development chain for CMOS-compatible MEMS products and technologies, from conception to process development, the construction of demonstrators and prototypes to pilot production in a state-of-the-art clean room according to industrial standards.

    At the IPMS-ISS branch in Cottbus, research is focused on two subject areas in cooperation with the Brandenburg University of Technology Cottbus-Senftenberg. In the “Monolithic Integrated Actuator and Sensor Systems” business area, a new class of electrostatic bending actuators (NED) is being developed and tested for a wide variety of fields of application. The innovative approach of the new actuator class enables the implementation of components, systems and applications such as micro and nanomanipulators, micro pumps and valves, micro loudspeakers and optical switches. The potential range of applications extends from optics, measurement and medical technology and biotechnology to communication technology.

    The institute also deals with the development of innovative, miniaturized terahertz micromodules and the evaluation of their applications. Due to its wavelength (1 THz corresponds to 300 µm) and its comparatively low photon energy in the milli-electron volt range, terahertz radiation is ideally suited for use in non-destructive material testing, telecommunications or diagnostics and imaging in medicine and biotechnology. Numerous applications, especially for mobile use, require a degree of miniaturization of the systems. The focus of the scientists at Fraunhofer IPMS-ISS is therefore the integration of the THz source, modulator and detector in a single system that can be miniaturized, CMOS-compatible and scalable. The research work is based on the expertise available at Fraunhofer IPMS in the field of system development, system integration and application testing of application-specific, electrostatically driven MEMS-based microscanner mirrors and micromirror arrays.

    Fraunhofer Institute for Photonic Microsystems IPMS with the Integrated Silicon Systems ISS branch
    c / o BTU Cottbus-Senftenberg
    Konrad-Zuse-Strasse 1
    03046 Cottbus

    Phone: +49 355 6930 - 94
    www.ipms.fraunhofer.de
    e-mail contact

    Head of the institute
    Dr. Sebastian Meyer